Cars Evaluation

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They found the two lowest income groups scored average on water use despite having a higher number of people living in each household. The middle-income group had high outdoor water use but ranked low in winter water use, signaling efficient indoor water appliances -- such as low-flow, high-efficiency faucets and toilets -- making them an ideal target for outdoor conservation features such as converting green spaces or upgrading to weather-based or smart irrigation controllers. The two highest income groups, characterized by highly educated homeowners living in comparatively larger homes, were the most dissimilar. One cluster -- younger residents on smaller lots with newer homes in dense, compact developments -- had the lowest water use of the entire city. The other high-income cluster consisting of older houses built on larger lots with fewer people turned out to be the biggest water consumer. The finding goes against most previous research linking income and water use, and suggests that changing how communities are built and developed can also change water use patterns, even for the most affluent customers. All groups showed high rates of water conservation during drought. Groups with the highest amount of savings (up to 37 percent during peak drought awareness) were the two thirstiest consumers (the high-income, large-lot and middle-income groups) demonstrating high potential for outdoor water conservation. Groups with lower normal water usage were also able to cut back, but were more limited in their savings. Understanding these limitations could inform how policymakers and city planners target customers when implementing water restrictions or offering incentives such as rebates during drought. This research lays the framework for integrating big data into urban planning, providing more accurate water use expectations for different describes it community configurations.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201118080752.htm

[Insurance]

“Hemp is an emerging agricultural commodity that presents a new opportunity for farmers looking to diversify their operations,” said Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Joe Bartenfelder in an Oct. 30 press release. “We have seen significant interest in the first two years of the Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program and we are excited to expand the state’s hemp industry with the new Hemp Farming Program.” Under the new Hemp Farming Program, growers may apply to produce and cultivate hemp for commercial purposes. In previous years, Maryland growers have only been able to produce hemp under the department’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program. Powell advised growers to work with universities to have access to as much information as possible. She also urged growers to consider that processing facilities may be in short supply when making their growing decisions. When it comes to dealing with banks and lending institutions, farmers may have to educate people about hemp. “Do not be discouraged, but ask questions and be honest,” she said. “You may have to do some education about legality. You may have to go from bank to bank.

https://www.lancasterfarming.com/farming/industrial_hemp/maryland-farmers-still-learning-about-hemp-production/article_a53dcb1d-d08d-56b3-9c2b-fa499120a797.html